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Recent Racial Tensions


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#81 queenbee1

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Posted 4 weeks ago

Push a man long enough and he will push back. Blacks have been screaming for out against white brutality, police brutality and harassment for four hundred years and finally we are paying attention. We are standing with him and saying enough! The police answer to no one with their immunity clause. Police unions assure that bad police get chance after chance and when caught or fired they just move on to another city.

 

Imagine that you saw Chauvin with his neck to a man's neck as he cried out for air and no one dare question the police. Someone could have saved Floyd's life, but at the risk of their own. We defer to authority figures so much so that Trump gets to make shit up and facts are no longer facts. They are opinions.

 

Don't forget that The Donald took out a full page ad in the NY Times calling for the death penalty for the Central Park 5 who were exonerated after being denied access to their parents during questioning and bullied into confessions by those who are supposed to protect and serve them. Why is it that in America the "usual suspects" always seem to be people of color?


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#82 slowmutant8

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Posted 4 weeks ago

By 'complacent whites' do you mean white people that were opposed to slavery but did not say so ?

 

By complacent whites I mean the majority of Southerners. The majority did not own slaves. The majority did not benefit directly from slavery (besides a sense of superiority they enjoyed by having a whole class of people they could look down on).

 

If white Southerners had risen up against slavery in their states, they could have ended it without a war. The fact that they didn't means that they share the blame for slavery continuing as long as it did.

 

You seem to be unaware of the bystander effect. The more other people that are present, the less likely individuals are to offer help to a victim. You are celebrating your role as a bystander. You are saying there is no responsibility to help and no need to feel guilty for not helping. Frankly, this is a contemptible mindset. Further, the fact that you would promote this mindset means you are actively harming the interests of victims. If there is a crisis and all you can say is "there is no need for me to help," everyone would be better off without you. It would have been better even if you had just said nothing. At least that way, you wouldn't encourage other bystanders not to help. 

 

Personally, I blame all the bystanders. It doesn't matter their race, creed or religion. I think if a Muslim goes into a park and kills 3 people, we should not assume other Muslims approve of it. However, if another Muslim starts saying "I do not need to denounce the killing," it is only natural to wonder what is wrong with him that he lacks basic compassion.


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#83 tobermoryx

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Posted 3 weeks ago

The majority of white southerners did support slavery though. And the majority of them opposed civil rights all the way to the 1960s. Lynchings were typically initiated by lower class whites. Most people 'accept the culture' they are brought up in.

 

I am familiar with the bystander effect, and the original case that it was named after. It is not remotely comparable to what is being discussed here. Nobody here is 'present' to intervene or decide not to. People 'actively' posting condemnations on the internet and holding placards are not at all on the same level as people phsyically intervening at their own risk to stop an injustice that is happening in front of them.

 

I would not assume that Muslims that are not condemning the park murders are in favour of them. I would assume they have the same reaction as anyone else. As you say, if they are asked about it and start equivocating, then you would indeed wonder what sort of person they are. And the same goes for the George Floyd case. If anyone asks me what happened I'll say he was murdered by the police, as I think would most white people would (I have not seen anyone defend it) but if someone is not saying this without being asked you can't blame them for anything.



#84 Don_Homer

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Posted 3 weeks ago

I read about and find an interesting article on this subject. It is about Brittain and the said bias there is in relation to racism. You can find it here: http://www.open-acce...reen access.pdf


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#85 astros

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Posted 3 weeks ago

The majority of white southerners did support slavery though. And the majority of them opposed civil rights all the way to the 1960s. Lynchings were typically initiated by lower class whites. Most people 'accept the culture' they are brought up in.

 

I am familiar with the bystander effect, and the original case that it was named after. It is not remotely comparable to what is being discussed here. Nobody here is 'present' to intervene or decide not to. People 'actively' posting condemnations on the internet and holding placards are not at all on the same level as people phsyically intervening at their own risk to stop an injustice that is happening in front of them.

 

I would not assume that Muslims that are not condemning the park murders are in favour of them. I would assume they have the same reaction as anyone else. As you say, if they are asked about it and start equivocating, then you would indeed wonder what sort of person they are. And the same goes for the George Floyd case. If anyone asks me what happened I'll say he was murdered by the police, as I think would most white people would (I have not seen anyone defend it) but if someone is not saying this without being asked you can't blame them for anything.

The silence is violence metaphor is perhaps ill-phrased and poorly applied in this case because the officers in question were charged and will likely be punished. It is more relevant in previous cases where officers got away with similar acts in fatal encounters. Alternatively, in a less extreme context, when police officers do little to change the culture that allows some of their colleagues to racially profile black men.


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#86 slowmutant8

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Posted 3 weeks ago

Most people 'accept the culture' they are brought up in.

 

That is exactly why we must all speak out and question the culture. Don't just be a sheep. And try to help others not be sheep either. 

 

I like that you are questioning the current fad of virtue signaling, but it would be great if you could also help fight against oppression. I know you have your own priorities in life, but I think your actions could have a great impact on those around you. 



#87 GaryLShelton

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Posted 2 weeks ago

Judging the past with current glasses is often going to end with incredulity at the older society. But the fact something is revolting to anyone today is irrelevant to the fact it wasn't revolting to those in that culture, in that time. Slavery just was. I'm sure people could still be good throughout a slave society even amidst what most of us now would feel was an awful world.

My father-in-law was a great guy, a man among men. He could have easily been a popular politician in the 60's in his home area. He's long gone now, but he wouldn't last a day in today's political climate. He was too fond of the N word. He would have been quickly on the hotseat like Marge Schott (former owner of the Cincinnati Reds baseball team who was accused of same thing). My point is that they were from a world that felt that that was normal. While I never used that word myself, I didn't find it surprising that the generation older than me might do so. When I was a kid...among many other things...a lot of people had little statues of black men dressed in red butler outfits on their lawns. These things didn't disappear suddenly but they're much rarer these days. The racial atmosphere has indeed changed in most of America since the 60's.

In matters of sensitivity between the races I've heard negroes go from being called that, to being called coloreds, to being called blacks, to finally being called the hyphenated moniker of African-Americans. I'm not sure that's the last thing that will be settled upon but it does show an evolution of thought on the matter. If the speed of other changes isn't fast enough for some today, that's regrettable, but think about what has changed since MLK's day. It's not nothing.
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#88 TemplateRex

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Posted 2 weeks ago

Someone who was still fond of the N-word in the 1960s sure would have loved to hold the whip in the 1860s.

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#89 TemplateRex

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Posted 2 weeks ago

Slavery just was.

You think those slaves stayed at the plantations out of their own free will?

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