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Really captured every piece that can move?


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#1 slowhand

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Posted 28 June 2015 - 04:13 PM

Hi,

 

after winning a multiplayer game of Stratego on spielspiele.de there was the message, that I have captured every piece that can move (in german). Does this really mean, my opponent could not move anymore (he had still four pieces left), or does it mean, that I have beaten every piece that allready has moved and he just resigned?

 

Does anyone know that?

 

slowhand

 

 



#2 tobermoryx

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Posted 28 June 2015 - 04:34 PM

If you got that message the opponent didn't resign. His other pieces were bombed in.

#3 slowhand

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Posted 28 June 2015 - 07:32 PM

O.k., so it´s true, as unbelievable as it is. That means he bombed in six pieces (I was wrong in my first post). And even his flag must have been outside, since seven stones had contact to the free space.



#4 TheOptician

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Posted 28 June 2015 - 07:59 PM

There is also another possibility (this has happened to me once) There has to be a free square for one of the opponents piece to move to. If the only possible move left is to engage in combat then the game is over, this is considered unable to move (Even if that combat engagement would have been victorious - although this is yet to be verified because it is very rare). So the chances are there was a movable piece, but this piece was trapped and so couldn't even commit suicide.



#5 slowhand

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Posted 28 June 2015 - 10:58 PM

There is also another possibility (this has happened to me once) There has to be a free square for one of the opponents piece to move to. If the only possible move left is to engage in combat then the game is over, this is considered unable to move (Even if that combat engagement would have been victorious - although this is yet to be verified because it is very rare). So the chances are there was a movable piece, but this piece was trapped and so couldn't even commit suicide.

None of my pieces was in his part of the board. So I did not block any squares. And none of his remaining stones had moved before, so I think he really had this strange bombs and flag block in 6 pieces setup.



#6 ITSA Trap

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Posted 29 June 2015 - 02:44 PM

I have seen this on here as well, albeit not so many pieces. Generally it means that his remaining pieces are bombed in and therefore cannot move.



#7 Kernel Mustard

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Posted 29 June 2015 - 04:09 PM

Thinking about this and what TheOptician said, I guess it's possible to win a game in the beginning against a player who has no moves.

 

5 bombs in the front row.

A4>5

 

A3>4

A4>3

 

A5>4

A4>5

A5>4

 

Checkmate :)



#8 TheOptician

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Posted 29 June 2015 - 06:01 PM

Thinking about this further I realise that something slightly different must have occurred in the case I referenced above. However I don't have time to explain now so I'll keep you in suspense.

#9 TheOptician

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Posted 29 June 2015 - 08:11 PM

In my case, the opponent had a number of pieces left, yet had designed the setup so that there was only one escape route left. Not wanting to lose his scout to my piece (and me not wanting to take it or lose to hi piece in waiting) he moved back and forth into an empty space three times to enforce the two squares rule, at which point he had no moves left. This unfortunately suggests that the inspiring method suggested by Kernel Mustard above would unfortunately not work, as piece suicide is likely considered a possible move, but not if it contravenes the two squares rule.

#10 The Prof

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Posted 29 June 2015 - 10:10 PM

Thanks TheOptician, it's good to know that your experience was not a bug in the programming, which although rare would be quite unfair if the piece blocked from moving could otherwise have killed the "trapping" piece.



#11 slowhand

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 03:08 PM

In my case, the opponent had a number of pieces left, yet had designed the setup so that there was only one escape route left. Not wanting to lose his scout to my piece (and me not wanting to take it or lose to hi piece in waiting) he moved back and forth into an empty space three times to enforce the two squares rule, at which point he had no moves left. This unfortunately suggests that the inspiring method suggested by Kernel Mustard above would unfortunately not work, as piece suicide is likely considered a possible move, but not if it contravenes the two squares rule.

Although you have not written this before, I felt this could be ment or at least be possible and so I mentioned, that in my case none of his stones had moved yet. But your example is interesting too.






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